Let’s Hear It for my Twitter Feed

I have resisted for years my twitter account for some reason or another. Even though I opened my account seven or so years ago I thought it was stupid and another great big time thief and refused to tweet or follow. However, I have recently changed my mind. I am lucky enough to have had my own KU Senior Social Media Intern for the summer. Consequently, she has been trying to show me the light for several weeks and has finally made a believer of me. I am quickly becoming aware of the stimulating resource that my twitter feed has become. She insisted I needed to follow an assortment of design resources, she figured out who all I might enjoy, thus populated my daily twitter feed with the latest and greatest in the field of design. I don’t even have to tweet all I have to do is read and I am set. Actually so are you, as I intend to make this post a regular occurrence. 438372877884985537_1dd5a76a8a99 How beautiful is this bathroom? A custom design printed on mylar…luscious. 438386666843935063_971a34f6d71a

Abstract painting …Untitled By Cy Twombly…passionate use of adjacent hues.

Abstract painting …Untitled By Cy Twombly…passionate use of adjacent hues.

It is all about the color and the line movement made by the color.  A passionate use of adjacent hues. To write about this painting with two sentences is a huge injustice, but I was thinking about it in terms of color at first. Then I remembered this wonderful artist died a few months ago, leaving a large body of work that was at times misunderstood and criticized, I suppose like all art.  Anyway, you might explore and learn a little more about this interesting contemporary artist at http://www.cytwombly.info/ as the link from the painting did not attach.  There was also an article in the NY Times last July, at the time of his death, that gives more insight into his art.  When questioned about reputation and artistic acclaim, Mr. Twombly said: “It’s something I don’t think about.  If it happens, it happens, but don’t bother me with it. I couldn’t care less.” On November 11, 2011 a 2006 acrylic Twombly painting, Untitled, sold for $9 million.  The highest price of the Phillips auction.
Beautiful use of color and natural movement.